Trophy Game in Canada

The “thrill of the hunt” has never been so thrilling until you’ve crossed the border into Canada. This is big game hunting in the truest sense – and it all awaits you and your party. Hunting in the Canadian territories and provinces includes:

Antelope

antelope
Limited to Alberta and Saskatchewan’s southern ranges, the sleek Canadian antelope offers hunters a challenge, due mainly to the relatively small herds (in fact, antelope and mule deer hunts are often combined to assure success.) Canadian pronghorn, the most common variety, weigh up to 135 lbs, standing about 3 1/2 feet at the shoulder. Males have a broad, black band running down their backs and large black horns that grow to about 20 inches. Females also have horns, but not exceeding 3 or 4 inches.

Bighorn Sheep

Bighorn Sheep
Bighorn sheep are at home in the Canadian Rockies and inhabit alpine meadows, grassy mountain slopes and foothill country in proximity to rugged, rocky cliffs and bluffs. Bighorns average 200 lbs., but have been known to reach in excess of 300 lbs. They have double-layered skulls shored with struts of bone for battle protection.

Bison

Bison
From well-stocked game preserves of several thousand acres, to the free ranges of Alberta, hunting for Canadian Bison is an adventure that instantly connects you with the plainsmen of a century-and-a-half ago. Mature bulls can reach about 2,200-2,600 lbs., and stand nearly 7 ft. at the shoulder. You’ll reach the herds by quad or snowmobile, and then track your quarry with the help of seasoned guides. You haven’t hunted until you’ve hunted game that weighs more than a ton!

Black Bear

Black Bear
Black bears can be found in virtually every Canadian province. Prime black bear habitat is characterized by relatively inaccessible terrain, thick undergrowth, and abundant sources of food in the form of shrub or tree-borne soft or hard mast. Black bears in North American typically range from four to six feet tall and reach 700 lbs., but Canadian black bears are somewhat smaller, more commonly weighing in at between 200 and 400 lbs.

Caribou

Caribou
Found in most of the Canadian provinces, but only hunted in a few, caribou are heavily concentrated in and around the boreal forests of the Yukon Territory, northern British Columbia, Newfoundland and Labrador. Herds of caribou also follow annual migration routes through the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Manitoba, and Quebec. Caribou tags are limited in many areas with the best hunting, so book your trip a year or more in advance. Mature bull caribous stand about four feet at the shoulder, with racks that measure three feet in height and up to five feet across. Weighing around 350 pounds — about double the size of a good-sized whitetail buck — caribou can be the culmination of the big-game experience for many hunters.

Cougar (Mountain Lion)

Cougar (Mountain Lion)
Mountain lions reside in the relatively mountainous, unpopulated areas across Canada, especially British Columbia and Alberta. Canadian cats are large, slender animals. They average 125 lbs.., but have been known to reach over 250 lbs.

Dall Sheep

Dall Sheep
If it’s a challenging hunt and memorable adventure you seek, look no further than Canada’s Dall sheep. Snow white year ‘round, Dall sheep rams sport massive curled horns and weigh up to 300 lbs.; ewes generally come in at about half that weight. They’ll gather in the meadows and ridges of the Yukon Territory, the western Northwest Territories and northern British Columbia to feed, but the moment they sense danger, it’s off to the safety of rugged mountain ranges and craggy cliffs. That’s where you’ll earn your trophy — and the right to tell the tale of how you bagged it.

Elk

Elk
Large populations of elk are found in western Canada throughout the Rockies region, preferring open woodlands to dense, unbroken forests. Adult elk average about 350 lbs. but can reach over 1,000 lbs. Examples range in color from dark brown in winter to tan in summer, and have a characteristic buff-colored rump.

Grizzly Bear (Brown Bear)

Grizzly Bear
Grizzly bear in western Canada have very stable populations. Grizzlies occupy a range of habitats, from desert edges to high mountain forests, to ice fields. In Canada, they seem to prefer open areas such as tundra, alpine meadows and coastlines. Canadian grizzlies often grow to more than 1,000 lbs.

Moose

Moose
Moose are found throughout Canada and their range coincides with that of boreal forests. They live in forested areas where there is snow cover in the winter, and prefer moist conditions where there are lakes, ponds, and swamps. Each can weigh up to 1,200 lbs.., with adults reaching up to 7 ft. tall.

Mountain Goat

Mountain Goat
The native range of this species is mainly British Columbia, the Yukon and Alberta as it relates to the Rocky Mountains. Mature Canadian mountain goats weigh around 150 lbs. and are stout-bodied with a thick coat made up of white hairs with some brown intermixed dorsally .

Mule Deer

Mule Deer
Named for their out-sized, mule-like ears, mule deer are found from southwestern Saskatchewan west to British Columbia, and are much larger then their whitetail cousins located in the “lower fifty.” Encountering Muley bucks exceeding 200 lbs. is not an uncommon occurrence, with examples on record weighing over 300 lbs. Rut occurs mainly from late November through mid-December, giving rifle and bow hunters plenty of chances to bag a big one.

Muskox

Muskox
Populating the Arctic tundra of northern-most Canada, the massive, shaggy muskox offers an unmatched big-game experience to rifle hunters looking for something truly unique. Trophy examples exceeding eight-feet in length and 800 lbs. are common, typically found traveling in packs of 10 to 20 animals. When sensing danger, the pack bunches tightly and forms a protective circle, giving hunters ample opportunities to choose their target. Hunts generally take place in March and April, and August through October.

Polar Bear

Polar Bear
The largest, most fearless of all Canadian bears, Polar bears are considered by many hunters the ultimate in big game hunting adventure — and hunting them requires a high level of endurance. Hunts take place on the arctic ice packs of Canada’s northern-most Polar reaches, where the physical and mental challenges of -40° daytime temperatures and nights spent in canvas tents are faced. In return, the Polar bear hunter is given the chance to bag a trophy few humans have ever, or will ever face. A good-sized male will weigh up to 1,200 pounds, with females coming in at about half that. Polar bear hunting is generally done in very late winter or early spring, February 15th through April 30th, when the arctic days lengthen.

Waterfowl

Waterfowl
For the purpose of helping you plan your adventure, Fishulo,llc groups all duck and goose hunts into the category of waterfowl. These trips vary greatly from hunting Ross geese on the tundra, to Snows in the potholes of Saskatchewan, to Divers on Lake of the Woods and everything in between. We will discuss in detail your waterfowling goals and recommend outfitters that best match your needs.

Whitetail Deer

Whitetail Deer
Whitetail deer inhabit most of southern Canada and are able to survive in a variety of terrestrial habitats, from the prairies, to the Rockies, to the boreal forests. Canadian whitetail deer are much larger than those found in the United States, with average weights of 200 lbs., though they can reach over 300 lbs.

Wolf

Wolf
Cunning and elusive, wolves are found throughout the provinces, from the Arctic tundra to the more temperate climates of southern Canada. Examples will be found in pure white, black, and tones of brown and grey. Hunted from January to March, depending on the province, wolves can be hunted on the move where their main travel routes along rivers are reached by snowmobile, or from heated blinds, where they will be baited and called. They’re known to travel in packs of up to 15, though it’s not uncommon to see them in clusters of two or three animals while hunting. Trophy males can reach 160 lbs. and 36″ at the shoulder.